Day 4: My Views on Religion

2018-01-05 10-2080376416..jpeg

If you asked me one of my biggest regret last month, that would be forgetting to cross this topic off the list and replace it with whatever less confusing than this. Honestly, this topic is something that I don’t feel comfortable to write about. I think I’m sweating a little. How am I supposed to start this with? Umm, ok, first of all, I’m a muslim, so this writing is pretty much based on my knowledge as a muslim, which is probably so little.

When I was a kid, maybe around four years old, I had no idea about religion. All I knew was I had to pray five times a day, go to mosque, read Quran, and do fasting on Ramadhan. Two of my childhood friends are dutch people. At that age I didn’t know the name of her religion except the fact that she had to go to church every Sunday and I had to wait for her to go back home so I could come over to her place to watch movie. At that time, I thought that being born to muslim parents was what made someone a muslim, or that someone’s religion was pretty much inherited from their parents because I was used to seeing people who shared the same religion as their parents.

As I grew older, I no longer see religion as something that’s inherited by our parents in our gene. I see it as a belief system where we have all the right to choose what we believe in or which path we want to follow, regardless of the religion of our parents. I saw people convert to muslim, and I saw my muslim friends convert to another religion. With all sort of upbringing that my family and teachers have given me, honestly I was quite shocked by the latter fact. But then I learned that we’re all, however, entitled to choose which religion to follow. Basically, religion gives people a set of guidelines to live by, so it’s pretty much up to them to choose which guidelines that they believe to be true. I can’t say that I support and justify what they did, but I highly respect their choices, and that won’t change the fact that they’re still my friends.

To me, when it comes to being friends, it doesn’t matter what religion they belong to as long as they’re a good person. I have friends who are agnostic and we still get along fine, in fact they’ve helped me a lot all this time. People should be and strive to be kind, because that’s the right thing to do, regardless of the religion they do or don’t belong to. Every religion basically teaches kindness and I’ve seen that since I was so little and knew so little about something named religion. But again, different people can have different interpretation of particular teaching in their religion and sometimes that’s what causes a problem. In Islam there are group of people who believe that saying ‘merry christmas’ to those who celebrate it is allowed for the sake of respecting them, but there are also those who believe that it’s not allowed to do so because it’s considered as believing another God besides Allah.

Sometimes I don’t understand how one teaching can be viewed or interpreted so differently even by those who belong to the same religion. I think muslim women know or at least have been told that wearing hijab to cover our aurah is a must and it doesn’t have anything to do with our behavior, and yet some people still have tons of excuses to not wear it. Some say that they’re not ready, that they’re still waiting for hidayah to come to them and knock their heart. Some say that it’s better to not wear it but have a good attitude rather than wearing it but still have a shit attitude. I think it’s just a matter of time. I’ve worn headscarf to school since junior high school but had to wait until 22 to finally wear it for good while constantly trying to improve myself.

If you know me in real life, I’ve never been a religious person. I have a problem with religious fanatics who shove their beliefs down other people’s throats, condemning everyone who doesn’t live by Islamic values, and only want to be friends with those who follow the same religion. Well, I haven’t fully lived by Islamic values. But I am trying to. One step at a time. I’m trying not to only follow the teachings that’s suited my way of thinking but then ignore the ones that are unreasonable according to my comprehension as a mere human being. After all, religion teaches kindness. And whatever your religion is, it’s supposed to make you a better person, isn’t it?

66 thoughts on “Day 4: My Views on Religion

    • Right. Religion is a personal matter, it’s supposed to be a source of comfort. It’s sad to see that people hurt others in the name of religion and causes so much serious conflict instead of peace.

      Liked by 3 people

  1. Even the most beautiful things in the world can be abused and manipulated. Religion is no exception. The thing what appeals me the most about Islam is that – There is no compulsion in religion. God gave us guidance and free will to follow. Hijab is not solely a veil, as much it is a modest and chaste conduct, embraced in kindness and self respect. Putting a veil on doesn’t make a good Muslim woman. Her behaviour does. I’m not defending my position now because I decided not to wear a veil. But, I have no problem putting one on if I’m going to places that require certain dress code. I don’t see it as a point of submission but rather as a point of liberation of the physical imperative. All the best in your further writing!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I do agree that putting on veil/hijab doesnt make someone a good muslim woman. It doesnt have anything to do with one’s behaviour. That’s why sometimes I feel uncomfortable when I do things that are considered bad and then people associate it with my hijab. By the way, thank you for dropping by my blog 🙂 🌹

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I am so proud and so happy about you! Political beliefs is the worst. I do believe that every religion are there to make us better, to be together create the world peace. Not war. Stand on what you believe and keep holding on it. We need more people like you 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Nadya. I can see it is quite brave of you to share your thoughts on religion. I applaud your efforts and your openness. Wishing more people, religious or not, would more often respect the individual choices of others. I am not religious (though I have been studying Buddhism), but I believe mankind’s purpose is to help others on their journey, whatever that may be.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you 🙂 I really didn’t feel comfortable to write this post at first, but your comment along with other comments here are what make me happy to finally decide to put it on my blog. And also thank you for visiting my blog 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Nadya, you left a like on my post (It’s Tough Being a Boy), so I came to visit you. I am very different from you; I am a great-grandmother, eighty-four years old and I am a Christian. I find your blog full of understanding and compassion. You write well. I am leaving a follow on your blog; I hope you will visit me again.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Very thoughtful article. My Christian faith is part of who I am and how I choose to live my life. However, like you, I have friends from all backgrounds; atheist, Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim and Christian. When people say I am religious I tell I prefer to think of myself as a person of faith that just happens to go to a particular brand of church. If I can live my life and make a difference along the way, then that’s a good thing. I don’t want to get bogged down in ritual and doing things just because that’s the way it has always been. Watched an interesting documentary last night on SBS TV in Australia, about 10 very diverse Muslim individuals sharing a house for a week. Part 2 is tonight. Many of the things you wrote about in your blog came up, such as not being Muslim enough!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Hey 🙂 thank you. I couldnt agree more with you. I also don’t want to do something merely bcs that the way it’s always been. That’s why I always try to find out the reason behind why a certain thing is done in a certain way. By the way, is there any way I could watch that documentary you mentioned above? On youtube, maybe?

      Like

  6. I am a Muslim too, I’m glad that you’ve written everything so perfectly. Humanity is the greatest of all religions. But u must remember what our belief is and it’s our duty to preach and get others to the right path with peace. Verily, Allah is the one God and may He shows them right path to choose.
    God bless you🙏

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for reading my blog. Yeaa i know that but i dont know how to say that and i dont wanna come across as if i’m already on the right path when actually i’m also trying to get there. God bless u too.

      Like

  7. You make a very good argument in favour of toleration of the religious views of others and I wholeheartedly endorse your humane and civilised approach. I am an agnostic but have the greatest respect for those who hold religious convictions provided that (as you rightly say) they don’t force their views on others. I’m fascinated by how people of the same faith interpret their religion in different ways. For example a muslim colleague who I like and respect often brings food into the office to share with others. As I am blind (I am writing this using screen reading software which converts text into speech and braille enabling me to use a Windows computer), my colleague often helps me by putting food on my plate when we are having an office party. On one occasion she asked another colleague to get me a low-alcohol beer (it was something like 0.01 percent alcohol) but, due to the tiny amount of alcohol in the beer she wouldn’t touch the bootle, a decision which I entirely respect as I wouldn’t want my colleague to do anything which made her feel uncomfortable/which she feels is against the teachings of Islam. However many muslim owned restaurants here in the UK do serve alcohol and drinks are handled (and poured) by the muslim staff working in them. I’ve politely asked them about islam’s view of alcohol and they answer that while muslims shouldn’t drink alcohol its okay for them to handle/sell alcoholic drinks, which just goes to show the divergence of views within the muslim community on the subject. Kind regards, Kevin

    Liked by 4 people

    • Hey Kevin, thank you so much for taking ur time to read my post. Yes, that’s one of the examples of how one teaching can be viewed differently by people who actually belong to the same religion, but as long as people do it with good intention, i guess it should be enough. 😉

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Hi, Mbak Nadia. Yes I call you Mbak, because I’ve stalk your social media and you are from Yogyakarta. *eh
    I came to your blog after you liked one of my comment from someone’s blog. And this is my first time drop to your blog.
    And wow, you are using English and you choose “heavy” topics to discuss. It shocked me for a while. Hahaha.
    But I enjoy reading this topic. You are a good thinker. 🙂
    Thank you for sharing this, Mbak Nadia.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi Mas Gallant, I also call you mas because i’ve stalked ur social media as well. You’re from east java, arent u?😂 *lho kok malah dadi stalking2an*
      I was halfway through reading one of your post when you left a comment on my blog.
      Jangan shocked maaas, ini ku tulis karena emg jadi salah satu topik dari 10 days writing challenge, ya biarpun sebenernya topiknya saya pilih yg agak bikin mikir biar kerasa challenge nya (?????)
      I’m glad if you enjoy reading my post. Terima kasih ya mas sudah membaca blog saya 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Nadya are you familiar with the law of abrogation? It is what Muslims scholars use to distinguish which verse to obey in the Quran of two passages conflict. It is very interesting and I think it is mostly the reason why there are multiple views/stances on certain passages in the Quran. I encourage you to investigate the law of abrogation. I enjoyed your writing on this subject and look forward to a blog about your opinion on the law of abrogation.

    Liked by 3 people

  10. Nadya, Thank you for visiting my blog, and for putting a like on my most recent post, “In Evil Times.” I was brought up to be a Christian, and I chose to believe in Jesus Christ as my Lord when I was yet a child. I am now 68 years old, and I still believe in Jesus, by choice, not just because that is what I was taught as a child. My faith is very strong, but not because of me, but because Jesus has given me strength to walk with him in faith. I do hope you will visit my blog again some day. You are a good writer, and you express yourself very well. Sue

    Liked by 3 people

  11. A very well written piece. Myself, I was born a Christian and had been educated that way at school, but for me the day I gave up believing and realised that there is no god, instantly the pressure was off. There was no hell to fear, there was no invisible being watching me and judging me. I didn’t have to go confess any “sins” that I hadn’t even committed, I was free.

    Did this make me a bad person? No. I give to charity, accept and respect others religion and sexuality, work with disabled children, treat all people with respect, abide by the law, I’m polite to strangers and will go out of my way to help people even if I don’t know them. I don’t need religion for these things.

    But if you do, that’s cool too.

    Good is inside us, it’s who we are. Not a book we’re taught to follow without question.

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Halo Mbak Nadya,
    saya jadi baca tulisan2nya Mbak Nadya karena si Mbak mbaca tulisan saya jalan-jalan ke Jogja. It’s very nice to see someone with a broad perspective on religion, especially when our countries (and Jogja as well) are associated with recurring religion intolerance incidents. Sukses terus buat si Mbak, salam dari Bandung!

    Liked by 3 people

  13. Very heavy topic but interesting. The question you asked is really hard for me to answer and I chose not to answer 😂 I have questions for you, what is religion? What is Islam?

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Nadya I started reading this and wondered about who you are. I too am interested in religion and why people are religious. In your “My daily makeup routine” you say the following: “Before putting on any makeup, I wait the skincare to absorb for about 5 minutes while I do other things … or simply thinking about how we’re all gonna die someday. ” The last few words struck me. I imagine as a Muslim you are thinking of the end of the world when you say, “we’re all going to die some day”. Cheer up!

    Like

  15. See, this is how we are evolving generation after generation. Do you really think a god will give someone fire of hell and burn his skin jist because he didn’t worshipped him? Do you think sharia law for apostasy which is death punishment can be justified? If we have faith or no faith, god is having more problems with this than our parents.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s